Photos: Visit Hawaii Volcanoes National Park on a Tour

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park is a beautiful place to visit, especially when you’re on a Big Island tour with experts who know the landscape, plants, and more. Our tour 33W takes you to several sightseeing locations on the Big Island of Hawaii, but perhaps the most spectacular is Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. We recently uploaded a number of photos from the National Park to our Flickr account.
Steam Vents at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

Steam Vents at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

On interesting site is a paved road covered in hardened lava from a recent flow. Visitors can actually walk across these areas, which makes for a great photo!
Lava-covered road at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

Lava-covered road at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

Halemauamau Crater was smoky and part of the Crater Rim Drive was closed off due to health hazards, but the sight was still amazing to see.
Halemaumau Crater at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

Halemaumau Crater at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

There were also plenty of great opportunities to take panoramic photos at the park.
Panoramic photo of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

Panoramic photo of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

Ancient petroglyphs can be seen at different locations in the park, but the Pu’u Loa Petroglyphs are some of the most well-known in the region. In fact, Pu’u Loa is considered a sacred place by Hawaiians and residents of Hawaii.
Pu'u Loa Petroglyphs at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

Pu'u Loa Petroglyphs at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

Missionary Rev. William Ellis wrote the earliest record of these petroglyphs in 1823:
Along the southern coast, both on the east and west sides, we frequently saw a number of straight lines, semicircles, or concentric rings, with some rude imitations of the human figure, cut or carved in the compact rocks of lava. They did not appear to have been cut with an iron instrument, but with a stone hatchet, or a stone less frangible than the rock on which they were portrayed. On inquiry, we found that they had been made by former travelers, from a motive similar to that which induces a person to carve his initials on a stone or tree, or a traveler to record his name in an album, to inform his successors that he had been there.
Pu'u Loa Petroglyphs

Pu'u Loa Petroglyphs

See more photos on our Flickr. More stops and sightseeing on our Tour 33W: Big Island Volcano from Oahu

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