Kiluaea Going Strong

The world’s most active volcano just keeps going, and for the foreseeable future, it is showing no signs of letting up. May 21, 2010 is another event and milestone in the eruption of Kilauea. Since January 3, 1983, and for the 10,000th consecutive day, the summit of Kilauea has kept scientists busy collecting information and data about the volcano’s internal workings. The ongoing eruption and gas emissions have produced a predominant mix of sulfur dioxide mixed with volcanic ash at about 200 tons to 2,000 tons a day. In the 27 plus years of activity, scientists have witnessed and investigated many events, including the opening of a new vent in March 2008. Possibly more important than the activity and information that has been gathered, and due to a road closure at Crater Rim Drive, there has been an increase in forest birds near the Chain of Craters Road intersection. The road closure is part of 4 miles out of 62 total miles of paved road through the park. Hawaiian traditions are also seeing benefits from the road closure as specific laws protecting Pele’s home are respected. Lava that steams is land that is still forming and not to be touched, according to cultural anthropologist Keola Awong. Scientists have also noticed signs showing just how connected the summit is to vents in other parts of the island. Tiltmeters, tubes a few feet high that are secured in the ground, contain liquid with an air bubble inside. These tiltmeters record how the air bubble shifts as the ground beneath the machine shifts. The closest views of the lava can be seen from Tour 33 our tour gets as close to the lava viewing as allowed by the Hawaii Civil Defense. Tours are available from Big Island, Oahu, Maui, and Kauai. This is the best lava viewing we have had for some time, take advantage of this once in a lifetime spectacle and join Discover Hawaii Tours on a magnificent tour that you will most certainly enjoy.

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