Ali’iolani Hale

aliiolani-hale1

About Ali’iolani Hale

Description


Ali’iolani Hale means “House of the Heavenly King” in Hawaiian. It’s one of Honolulu’s must-see landmarks that houses the Supreme Court of Hawaii, the court administration offices, a law library, and the King Kamehameha V Judiciary History Center. Just outside is the King Kamehameha the Great Statue and directly across the street is Iolani Palace. In 1972, the building was listed on the US National Register of Historic Places. Look for the Ali’iolani Hale each week on Hawaii 5-0!

History


The Ali’iolani Hale was designed by Australian Thomas Rowe in an Italian Renaissance Revival as the royal palace for King Kamehameha V. In Hawaiian, “Ali’iolai” means “House of the heavenly King”, Ali’iolani was also one of the given names of Kamehameha V. On February 19, 1872 King Kamehameha V laid the cornerstone for the building that he had commissioned as a government office building not a palace. He died before the building was completed. It was dedicated in 1874 by King David Kalakaua.

Facts & Trivia

  • Island: Oahu
  • Duration: Drive-by Only
  • Amenities: No amenities at this location on our tours.
  • Insider Tip: Look for the King Kamehameha the Great Statue out front, and the Iolani Palace across the street!
  • Fun Fact: A major reconstruction of Ali'iolani Hale went underway in 1911 after the wooden beams and floors were damaged by termites. Plus, the building was deemed unsafe because it was not fireproof.
  • What to Expect: Nearby landmarks like Kawaiahao Church, Hawaii State Library, Honolulu Hale and the Hawaii State Capitol Building.
  • Pop Culture: The building was used in three different episodes of LOST, twice as a court office and once as a university library.